beatles

Eight Days A Week: The Real Post

Ok, now for some real thoughts on Eight Days A Week.

When I first heard about this documentary, I was a little disappointed that there wouldn’t be a “studio years” installment, which in my mind would’ve been much more interesting. But after watching the film, I appreciate the focus on the touring years, because: 1) It reminds us just how nuts Beatlemania was, and 2) It’s super interesting to see how the Beatles affected everything that was going on culturally and socially in the mid-60s (their refusal to play segregated venues, the Jesus quote debacle, etc.). I mean, that continued into the late 60s too, but when they were touring, they were much more in the spotlight. Oh, and 3) The press conferences. So many zingers.

Here’s a rundown:

The good:

  • New stuff for die-hards. Although I’d seen most of the concert and interview footage over the years, it was nice to see some new material. Like interviews with fans (“George has sexy eyelashes!”), the German press conference where a reporter asked the Beatles why they’re so snobby (good job deflecting that one, Paul), and a fan’s home video of the ’66 Candlestick show.
  • Restored audio. I never really liked watching Beatles concert footage because the sound was so atrocious (it’s just…all teenage screaming). But Giles Martin a.k.a. Son of God worked his magic on the recordings and they actually sound pretty amazing.
  • The #dreamteam. I’m glad that appropriate tribute was paid to Brian Epstein and George Martin, and that Mal Evans, Neil Aspinall, and Derek Taylor didn’t go unnoticed either. The Beatles had a surprisingly small entourage when touring the world from 1964-1966, and I’ve always admired how close they all were with these guys.
  • Shea Stadium. (You only got to see the whole concert if you watched the movie in theaters.) The shots of the fans are priceless and the Lennon antics are at an all time high.
  • George comparing the Beatles to rhubarb. He would.

The meh:

  • Questionable Lennon censorship. I thought it was kinda weird they corrected John’s lyric flubs for some of the live performances (personally, I think they’re endearing). Although it’s probably for the best that they edited out his clap hands/stomp feet routine…
  • Random interviews e.g. “we’re gonna bring in Eddie Izzard to talk about how the Beatles responded to media hecklers, and we’re gonna show him juuust long enough to make you think, wait, what’s Eddie Izzard doing here?”
  • Colorized film. Unnecessary. It makes everything look so fake and bad.
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whyyyyyyy

The film is available on Hulu, but seeing it in a theater of fellow Beatlefans was pretty entertaining, if you get a chance to do so. Like the audible horror at the colorized footage, everyone clapping along to “Eight Days A Week,” and the guy in the front yelling along with “GOOD OL’ FREDA!”

I think Ron Howard did an excellent job bringing Beatlemania back to life, while also capturing what made people like me fall in love with the Beatles in the first place: their wit, charm, and boundary-pushing music. Ending the film with the rooftop concert was expected, but it still made me tear up. The Beatles and their music came such a long way in such a short amount of time, it’s insane. Their fans grew up, too: from screaming, crying teenagers to young men and women quietly watching from rooftops across the street. Whenever I start thinking about the arc of the 60s and how the Beatles influenced it, I get all emotional, so I’m just going to stop right here.

TL;DR: Eight Days a Week is definitely worth a watch. There are some weird bits, but the great restored footage and cheeky interviews more than make up for it.

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Thanks guys, you’re the best.
buster keaton, silent movies

The Art of the Gag

It’s Buster’s birthday, and this was on the front page of Reddit tonight. I’ve never been so quick to subscribe to a YouTube channel after watching a video (well, except maybe this time).

I love the choice of clips mixed with the audio interviews with Buster (he’s from Kansas, can you tell?). I’m a huge believer that physical comedy, when done right, is a legit form of art. No one proves it better than Buster.

The guy who made this has done a lot of other really interesting videos about filmmaking, with topics ranging from the Coen Brothers’ use of wide lenses to temp music to “Bayhem.” A lot of the stuff I post on here is very specific to my interests, but man, I can’t think of anyone who wouldn’t enjoy this guy’s stuff. 10/10 would binge-watch again.

beatles

Eight Days A Week: A Drinking Game

Sooooo, I’ve watched Eight Days A Week twice in the past 24 hours and have a lot to say about the film itself, but while I put that together, here’s a drinking game.

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One drink whenever:

  • A photo is subtly “enhanced” with moving cigarette smoke
  • Modern-day Ringo is seen wearing a peace sign
  • George waves awkwardly
  • The Beatles perform in a different country
  • Brian Epstein looks fabulous
  • Someone describes something as “mahhvelous,” “fab,” or “a laff”
  • There’s a cheesy reference to the Beatles’ haircuts
  • Georgestache
  • Paulbeard
  • A girl faints (it was going to be whenever a girl screams, or cries, but that is literally the entire film)

Two drinks:

  • For any B&W footage that is obviously/painfully colorized
  • Jimmie Nicol appears
  • Paul admits to being high during the filming of Help!

Chug:

  • George Martin is directly referred to as a god
  • John apologizes
  • “GOOD OL FREDA!”

Disclaimer: It’s possibly more fun to come up with these than to actually play them (see also: TOS 1TOS 2, and Pete Townshend’s autobiography). Really, all I’m trying to get you to do is watch the film.

tv

August was beautiful and so are you

The title of this post came from a dream I had last night. Except in the dream I kept trying to write out the phrase and couldn’t spell for the life of me, so actually more like a nightmare?


Some noteworthy things from last month:

ED RUSCHA AND THE GREAT AMERICAN WEST. We went to see this exhibition at the DeYoung and I could’ve stayed there for hours. It’s like walking through a museum display of True Stories: images of gas stations, parking lots, billboards, and flat western landscapes, accompanied by quirky titles and phrases.

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Maybe it was because I spent 5 years in LA (where Ruscha has lived most of his life) and grew up taking roadtrips through the Southwest that this exhibition was especially fascinating to me. In any case, I highly recommend checking out Ruscha’s works if your aesthetic is anything close to mine.

WRONG WAY UP. Been slowly delving into Eno’s discography through his collaborations with other people, and this one—made with John Cale in 1990—is absolutely wonderful. Listen here.

STRANGER THINGS. Man, supernatural 80s throwbacks featuring kids on bikes are so hot right now (see: Super 8, Paper Girls). But seriously, what a fantastic show. Also, the original soundtrack is really, really cool.

TWIN PEAKS. Previously, I’d never really been interested in watching Twin Peaks (too creepy? too weird? too dark?), but apparently it’s a natural progression after Stranger Things, or at least Netflix thought so. At this point we’re halfway through, and I find myself weirdly captivated despite totally hating it at first. We just finished the first episode of Season Two and it’s some of the best television I’ve ever watched. I love the bizarre, surreal scenes (and hate the melodramatic soap opera stuff, as self-aware as it may be). I hear Season Two is pretty hit or miss, so we’ll see what happens from here.

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In other news, it’s finally starting to get warm(er) in San Francisco and we are going to the Roots Picnic in less than a month! LILYAIG.

live music, new music

This week’s suggestion: listen to Fantasma

Writing this as Outside Lands goes on literally right down the street (yes, now that we live practically at the entrance to the festival, we opted not to get tickets this year). Listening to the music from the couch while wearing sweatpants is pretty cool, I must say…although I could do without the horde of drunk people outside the apartment at 11pm. I must be getting old.

OSL or not, it’s been an excellent week for live music. On Wednesday, The Spencer Owen Timeshare opened for New Zealand-based Andrew Keoghan at the Hemlock, and it was so much fun (also, I learned how to make Instagram stories, so y’all better watch out). Andrew Keoghan and his band were really great, and of course the Timeshare were on point too. Rumor has it this is the last show in a while, which makes me sad (but excited for potential recordings to come!).

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Then Thursday night we saw Cornelius at The Fox, which was incredible. I didn’t know much about Cornelius (real name Keigo Oyamada) going into the show, but was almost immediately won over by his eargasmic sonic landscapes (take, for instance, The Micro Disneycal World Tour).

I am a sucker for intricately choreographed shows (see: OK Go, Stop Making Sense, drum corps), so I was especially blown away by auditory/visual synchronization of this show. I have no idea how they do it, but the band manages to sync these crazy tight songs perfectly with the videos projected behind them throughout the entire show. This is a good example:

I did some reading up today and learned that Cornelius came out of the Japanese Shibuya-kei scene, described by Wiki as “a kitsch revival of 1960s culture” and by LA Weekly as having a distinct “’60s-meets-’90s vibe.” So basically, it’s the perfect combination for the 60s enthusiast in me, the 90s enthusiast in Alex, and the Japan enthusiast in both of us.

I can’t wait to listen to more. Also, I really really want to go back to Tokyo.

misc

Blue songs

Today I tried out Spotify’s Discover Weekly for the first time. For the uninformed, it’s a music discovery algorithm that takes songs you’ve listened to recently, finds playlists containing those songs, then chooses other songs from those playlists and presents them to you in a 2-hour bundle every Monday. It’s a surprisingly accurate way of finding music that I both really enjoy and haven’t heard before. Kudos, Spotify!

Favorite discoveries of the day included  “If I Stay Too Long” by The Creation (could totally hear this in a Wes Anderson movie) and “Boy Blue” by ELO (I have a feeling there are a lot of ELO songs I’ve never heard but would really love).

But the major discovery was this gem, which I thought FOR SURE was a Rolling Stones deep cut until I looked at the artist name:

Nope, not the Stones covering Dylan. Just a lead singer who made it his goal to sound EXACTLY like Mick Jagger.

I looked them up; they’re a Bay Area band from the 60s who had a decent amount of success. Who knew?

movies, new music

July sampler

Some things I’ve been digging lately, in no particular order:

Harry Nilsson’s Son of Schmilsson. I knew a lot about Nilsson way before ever listening to him, mainly because all of my favorite musicians loved hanging out with him in the 70s (seriously, look at this picture). A few weeks ago when I was at home in Vista, I pulled out Son of Schmilsson from my dad’s collection and immediately understood why all these guys loved him. Aside from being laugh-out-loud funny, the songs on this album are incredibly well-crafted and just straight up good. Fatefully, I happened to find a copy of the album at the latest Alameda Antiques Faire, and it’s been sitting on the record player ever since.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Ok, I finally watched this movie (seriously, what took me so long?) and now I am obsessed with it. It’s one of the most brilliant films I’ve ever seen…outrageous and hilarious and quite terrifying all at the same time. Can you imagine what watching this in early 1964 was like?

George C. Scott is amazing (we also recently saw him in The Hustler, the 1961 Paul Newman film, and I’m quickly becoming a fan), but no one can top the genius of Peter Sellers in this film.

For me, Sellers falls into the same bucket as Nilsson: someone I first became aware of because of his associations with the Beatles (let’s face it, everything I become interested in somehow stems from the Beatles). But I hadn’t really seen/heard much of his work until recently. After this, I can’t help but feel like I have lots of treasure to uncover.

Trivia: Sellers was one of the only people that Kubrick let improvise in one of his movies; as a result, most of his scenes are ad-libbed. Notably, this one, where you can see Peter Bull trying to hold back laughter around 3:10.

New music! Another shoutout to A Song A Day (and also Alex) for keeping me in touch with all the excellent music of today. Lately I’ve been enjoying: